Camino del Bosque Bio-retention Basin

In 2014, Southwest Urban Hydrology partnered with the City of Santa Fe, the RainCatcher, River Source, Oxbow Ecological Engineering, and Watershed Artisans to address stormwater concerns on the Santa Fe River and Arroyo Chamisos.  One component of the project was to capture and remediate stormwater pollutants originating from over 1-acre of residential impervious surface.  Historically stormwater from streets, driveways, and rooftops was funneled into stormdrains, piped underground, and released into the Arroyo Chamisos.  This method effectively dried out soils and flushed pollutants into a channel already overwhelmed by excess runoff.

In the spring of 2015 three storm drains were capped to lift runoff above ground again.  Stormwater was captured in two basins along an easement running parallel to the arroyo.  The first basin had ~20 inches of wood chip, sand, and organic soil layers to help filter the first flush of stormwater.  Once runoff fills the bio-remediation layers it is allowed to fill the second basin in equilibrium with the top ~16 inches of open volume of the first basin.  The bio-retention basin will capture > 10,700 gallons of water before excess runoff during high intensity events will enter the Arroyo Chamisos.  Vegetation was planted in and around the basins to help absorb, filter, and degrade stormwater pollutants.

A series of repeat photos of the project installation can be found here.

Camino del Bosque bio-retention basin looking north during an April precipitation event.

Camino del Bosque bio-retention basin looking north during an April precipitation event.